Tuesday, 16 August 2016 21:01

Patriotism of Religious Scientists August 2016 Blog by James Van Cleave, Ph. D.

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BLOG FOR AUGUST 2016

Patriotism of Religious Scientists

By James Van Cleave, PhD

Science of Mind Archives Board President

Being a theologian, I can say that one difference between the ministers and theologians in a seminary is that the ministers are expected to behave. The theologians? Not so much!

We tend to read an awful lot and when I get into something written by Ernest Holmes or one of his associates, I fit what is said into my understanding of the overall Religious Science theology. And it is a wonderful and systematic theology that can not only stand toe-to-toe with any other denomination that, in a fair and logical debate, will always prevail. But Ernest Holmes, as we know, told us that any such debate is never fair and is a complete waste of time. Anyway, the theology is very well worked out and is whole and complete and perfect as well as being open at the top for new scientific discoveries.

A personal interest of mine concerns how a theology that emphasizes Love, Oneness, and Universality can handle a war. In particular, just how did Ernest et al handle World War II? The answer is amazing but we will look at only a little of it today.

First of all, the Religious Science movement has always been very patriotic. In the December 1942 Science of Mind magazine (The Light of Truth, 7), Ernest wrote:

            "We can do everything to serve our country in the cause of freedom, and we shall   do everything. You and I, every person, every American and every freedom-loving person throughout the world, is going to do everything that he can to crush despotism, but he doesn’t have to hate any one to do it."

A few months later, in July 1943 (Faith for the New Age, 6), Ernest declared:

            "I don’t think we have any doubt about the final outcome of this present world conflict. ... Yes, we know that we shall win the war, and yet there is nothing arrogant in our attitude."

You can be sure that President Roosevelt and General Eisenhower were overjoyed to hear that! Ernest likely prepared this article in early 1943, when Eisenhower had just begun to plan the Allied invasion of Europe. It is no wonder that Ernest later had his radio program This Thing Called Life on the Armed Forces Network, which was the only religious program allowed for our troops! (That was Ernest, 122-23)

I must confess, though, that when you go online to review these and other WWII articles in Science of Mind magazine, you won’t find anything between 1941 and 1950, yet. You will have to personally visit us in Golden to see the originals. The digitizing of the magazine is well underway but certainly not yet complete. It is by your donations to the Archives – and we are independent of CSL for funding – that we can do the incredible work of digitizing the magazines, photographs, audios, and videos of Ernest and his associates. Literally every Center, every minister, and every scholar benefits from the information that we are rediscovering every day at the Archives. 

We have two programs for funding. For practitioners, we have 1st Circle. For Centers and individuals we have Friends of Ernest. Notice that I have addressed Dr. Holmes as Ernest within this blog, and I get to do that because I am one of the Friends of Ernest. I’m sorry, but if you aren’t in the support group, you should address our founder as Dr. Holmes. That is, until you join us. Please do.  

It is easy to do.  Just go to our main website and go to the "Donate" tab, and pick which program you would like to join:  http://somarchives.org/  

Thank you and Bless you for your important support to preserve our priceless SOM history.

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